Category

World Toilets

Category

On November 19, the world celebrates International ‘Toilet Day’. Skats.lv, of course, wonders how fast time passes, because there is a feeling that only yesterday we took off last year’s toilet day decorations in our homes. In honor of this event, we have decided to look at sadness and possibly a bit of melancholy coming in different countries of the world. After all, what happens in places in domestic public toilets is quite well absorbed in our visual memory and does not require a reminder.
Melancholic and depressed world toilets
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One of the biggest problems of traveling around China is discussed in a motorcyclists’ forum – public toilets, which often involve a shock for Europeans. They are without doors and often without walls. We would even like to call them drag toilets.
Ride Asia

Melancholic and depressed world toilets
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In Cambodia’s poor areas, nature’s treasures are returned directly to the river. As an advantage, we see here the opportunity to fish ‘during the process’.
SkippyG

Melancholic and depressed world toilets
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Although Japan is famous for its highly advanced and modern toilets, a blogger living there has revealed to the world that there are not always computerized toilets everywhere. For example, the ‘tuxedo’ in a Hiroshima high school is quite challenging for convenience lovers.
The Only Blonde in Osaka

Melancholic and depressed world toilets
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In Tibet, the key is simplicity – no partitions, no extra conveniences.
Bob Witlox

Melancholic and depressed world toilets
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Travel bloggers ‘Backpackies’ have also produced visual material that will be useful for those who travel in most Asian countries – they point out that this is a scenario to keep in mind if the nights are not spent in fine hotels.
Backpackies

Melancholic and depressed world toilets
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Meanwhile, blogger Laura Hii has expressed reserved enthusiasm for the public toilet in the Malaysian city of Sarikei.
Laurahii

Melancholic and depressed world toilets
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This is what the toilet looks like, which the author describes as an ‘incredibly clean Thai public transport toilet’. Unable to understand whether it is necessary to sit, sit or perform any other acrobatic activity on it, Skats.lv assumes that it is simply intended for creative people.
Chris Feser / cc